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Sunday, 27-Mar-2011 15:27 Email | Share | Bookmark
Something You Should Know About Wood Bees

Carpenter bees, or often called wood bees, can be seen flying round the wood structures on your house. Often times, they are confused with bumble bees, which look extremely like carpenter bees. But you can safely presume that if your bees are flying around the wood on your house, they're carpenter bees. Usually black and yellow or black and orange, carpenter bees are dissimilar from bumble bees because their stomachs are glossy and black. Unlike bumble bees that are social insects, carpenter bees are often seen working alone. Also, bumble bees burrow underground while carpenter bees dig tunnels in the wood of your house or other structures.

Male wood bees can't sting. Most of the wood bees one encounters are males. They can approach folk who swat at them, or hover around others, but can't sting. Even the females, who are quite able of stinging, often won't unless extremely provoked.

As light as they may be, wood bees may cause loads of damage to a house. They do not eat wood. It isn't the 1st drilling into one's home that causes the damage. It is the tunnels built by brood each year that expand tunnels and branch out into one's home. This could cause structural damage. They also defecate inside the home, causing stains. Wood bees like unpainted areas such as telefone poles, doors, windows, eaves of roofs, railings, and even unpainted lawn furniture.

When a queen wood bee begins her home, she drills a circular hole, about half an in. around, into her wooden item of preference. This hole will probably be against the grain of the wood. When it's about an inch deep, the bee will turn at a right angle and start tunnelling with the grain.

In the winter, these holes are used as nests for hibernation for manly and female bees. After spring mating, the bees either enlarge old tunnels or make new tunnels to use as brood chambers. Each chamber contains a miniscule bee bread ( a mixture of pollen and regurgitated nectar ) which feeds the larvae. Then an egg willbe laid on the bee bread and the chamber is sealed. Most females use 6 to 8 chambers. When the eggs hatch, the larvae develop and leave the nest in August, feed, and return to the tunnels for the winter hibernation.

Because wood bees are ruinous to houses, most house owners need to get rid of them. If the entrance to the tunnels is found, an insecticidal dust can be sprayed into the tunnel. Dusters are available that puff dust into the tunnel and coat the sides with the dust. After treatment, the house owner should launder everything that he wore. The poisonous insecticide could have settled on his clothing.

The perfect time to dust wood bee tunnels is at night. Bees aren't active then. Tape some red cellophane over a flash-lamp. Bees can't see the color red but the house owner will be able to see the tunnel. Many householders hire bug elimination firms to rid their homes of wood bees. The insecticide is lethal and the house owner is often working on high eaves.

Carpenterbees, or regularly called wood bees, can be seen flying round the wood structures on your place. Oftentimes, they're confused with bumble bees, which look extremely like carpenter bees. But you can safely presume that if your bees are flying round the wood on your house, they're carpenter bees. Typically black and yellow or black and orange, carpenter bees are dissimilar from bumble bees because their stomachs are glossy and black. Unlike bumble bees that are social insects, carpenter bees are often seen working alone. Also, bumble bees burrow underground while carpenter bees dig tunnels in the wood of your place or other structures.

Male wood bees can't sting. Almost all of the wood bees one encounters are males. They can approach folks who swat at them, or hover around others, but can't sting. Even the females, who are quite able of stinging, regularly won't unless extremely provoked.

As light as they might be wood bees may result in tons of damage to a home. They do noteat wood. It's not the first drilling into one's home that causes the damage. It is the tunnels built by brood every year that expand tunnels and branch out into one's home. This may cause structural damage. They also defecate inside the home, causing stains. Wood bees like unpainted areas such as telefone poles, doors, windows, eaves of roofs, railings, and even unpainted grass furniture.

When a queen wood bee starts her home, she drills a circular hole, about half an in. Around, into her wooden item of preference. This hole will often be against the grain of the wood. When it's about an in. deep, the bee will turn at a right angle and start tunnelling with the grain.

In the winter, these holes are used as nests for hibernation for gentlemanly and female bees. After spring mating, the bees either enlarge old tunnels or make new tunnels to use as brood chambers. Each chamber contains a miniscule bee bread ( a mix of pollen and regurgitated nectar ) which feeds the larvae. Then an egg will be laid on the bee bread and the chamber is sealed. Most females use Six to 8 chambers. When the eggs hatch, the larvae develop and leave the nest in Aug, feed, and return to the tunnels for the winter hibernation.

Because wood bees are ruinous to homes, most house owners need to get shot of them. If the entrance to the tunnels is found, an insecticidal dust can be sprayed into the tunnel. Dusters are available that puff dust into the tunnel and coat the sides with the dust. After treatment, the house owner should launder everything that he wore. The deadly insecticide could have settled on his clothing.

The perfect time to dust wood bee tunnels is at night. Bees aren't active then. Tape some red cellophane over a flash-lamp. Bees can't see the color red but the house owner will be in a position to see the tunnel. Many householders hire bug elimination firms to rid their houses of wood bees. The pesticide is deadly and the house owner is sometimes working onhigh eaves.

If you dust the entrance to the carpenter bee tunnels, you have got to close them off too all of an astonishing. Give the bees time to come in contact with the insecticide. This will permit them to not only be contaminated themselves, however it gives them the opportunity to share the insecticide with other bees in their nest. Once you detect that there is no more activity, you can caulk the holes and paint over it. Carpenter bees like half finished and soft wood, so you will notice that after you paint over the wood, they can simply go some other place to look for a place to nest.\nRelated Sites : carpenter bee repellent


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